Race and Renaissance: African Americans in Pittsburgh since World War II


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membership.embedded-vision.com/love-and-the-game.php From jazz legend Earl Fatha Hines to playwright August Wilson, from labor protests in the s to the Black Power movement of the late s, Pittsburgh has been a force for change in American race and class relations.

Joe William Trotter, Jr.

It examines the origins and significance of the second Great Migration, the persistence of Jim Crow into the postwar years, the second ghetto, the contemporary urban crisis, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and the Million Man and Million Woman marches, among other topics. In recreating this period, Trotter and Day draw not only from newspaper articles and other primary and secondary sources, but also from oral histories.

These include interviews with African Americans who lived in Pittsburgh during the postwar era, uncovering firsthand accounts of what life was truly like during this transformative epoch in urban history. In these ways, Race and Renaissance illuminates how African Americans arrived at their present moment in history.

Joe William Trotter Jr.

Yet the transformation of rural blacks into a predominantly urban people is a relatively recent phenomenon - only during World War I did African-Americans move into cities in large numbers, and only during World War II did more blacks reside in cities than in the countryside. In recreating this period, Trotter and Day draw not only from newspaper articles and other primary and secondary sources, but also from oral histories. I could have read an entire chapter, for example, of stories about the Freedom House Ambulance Service, which was organized to serve black communities passed over by other ambulance operators. And who remembers that in the late s, white North Siders were complaining that real-estate agents dissuaded potential homebuyers from the area by "citing the predominantly black Northview Heights housing project" nearby? And a motif of the book is that black perspectives on issues like public housing, or school busing, were often more conflicted than current political rhetoric assumes. This format enables readers to develop their own synthesis of key socioeconomic and political changes in the state's African American experience over more than three centuries of time. Cheryl Finley, assistant professor in the history of art at Cornell University, offers the first thorough analysis of Harris as an artist, situating him within the history of 20th?

It also links movements for change to larger global issues: African Americans in Pittsburgh since World War II by Joe William Trotter 9 editions published between and in English and held by 1, WorldCat member libraries worldwide African Americans from Pittsburgh have a long and distinctive history of contributions to the cultural, political, and social evolution of the United States.

From jazz legend Earl Fatha Hines to playwright August Wilson, from labor protests in the s to the Black Power movement of the late s, Pittsburgh has been a force for change in American race and class relations. It examines the origins and significance of the second Great Migration, the persistence of Jim Crow into the postwar years, the second ghetto, the contemporary urban crisis, the civil rights and Black Power movements, and the Million Man and Million Woman marches, among other topics.

In recreating this period, Trotter and Day draw not only from newspaper articles and other primary and secondary sources, but also from oral histories. These include interviews with African Americans who lived in Pittsburgh during the postwar era, uncovering firsthand accounts of what life was truly like during this transformative epoch in urban history.

Trotter, Joe William 1945-

In these ways, Race and Renaissanceilluminateshow African Americans arrived at their present moment in history. It also links movements for change to larger global issues: As such, the study draws on both sociology and urban studies to deepen our understanding of the lives of urban blacks. African American urban life in the Ohio Valley by Joe William Trotter 10 editions published between and in English and German and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide Since the nineteenth century, the Ohio River has represented a great divide for African Americans.

It marked the passage to freedom along the underground railroad, and during the Industrial age it was a boundary between the Jim Crow South and the urban North.

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Consequently, the Ohio became known as the "River Jordan," symbolizing the path to the promised land. Beginning with the arrival of the first blacks in the Ohio Valley, Trotter traces the development of African American urban centers through the civil rights movement.

River Jordan broadens our understanding of the black experience in the United States and illuminates the impact of the Ohio River in the context of the larger American story. The Great migration in historical perspective: These essays analyze the role of African Americans in shaping their own geographical movement, emphasizing the role of black kin, friend, and communal network. African American urban experience: Yet the transformation of rural blacks into a predominantly urban people is a relatively recent phenomenon - only during World War I did African-Americans move into cities in large numbers, and only during World War II did more blacks reside in cities than in the countryside.

By the early s, blacks had not only made the transition from rural to urban settings, but were almost evenly distributed between the cities of the north and the west on the one hand and the south on the other.

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In their quest for full citizenship rights, economic democracy and release from an oppressive rural past, black southerners turned to urban migration and employment in the nation's industrial sector as a new "Promised Land" or "Flight from Egypt". In order to illuminate these transformations in African-American urban life, this book brings together urban history, contemporary social, cultural and policy research and comparative perspectives on race, ethnicity and nationality within and across national boundaries.

Coal, class, and color: African Americans in the industrial age: African Americans in the Industrial Age: A Documentary History, fills that gap by providing a wide selection of documents that re-create the social history of African Americans during this watershed period. Oral life histories, memoirs, letters, newspaper accounts, federal surveillance reports, employment records, and photographs are among the primary sources contained in this work.

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From a raw deal to a New Deal? African Americans, by Joe William Trotter Book 7 editions published between and in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide Discusses the experiences of African Americans from the beginning of the depression in to the end of World War II. African Americans in Pennsylvania: Unfortunately, much of it is scattered in books and journals that are not easily accessible.

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Under the editorship of Joe W. Trotter and Eric Ledell Smith, African Americans in Pennsylvania brings together an outstanding array of this scholarship and makes it accessible to a wider audience, including general as well as professional students of the black experience.

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This volume, co-published with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, offers the most comprehensive history of the state's black history to date. Chapters emphasize the interplay of class and race from the origins of the Commonwealth during the seventeenth century, through the era of deindustrialization in the late twentieth century. We see not only poor and working-class people but also educated business and professional people. And although scholarship has traditionally focused on the experiences of black men, this volume includes significant research on black women.

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Race and Renaissance: African Americans in Pittsburgh since World War II [Joe W. Trotter, Jared N. Day] on owiluxyfiq.tk *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Race and Renaissance. African Americans in Pittsburgh since World War II. Trotter, Joe, Day, Jared. Race and Renaissance presents the first history of African.

Most important, this volume suggests a conceptual framework for a historical synthesis of the state's African American experience.